Cullsman #9 – 9 Science Fiction Stories

MJG Books, Overview 6 Comments

Cullsman #9 is a collection of 9 science fiction stories that chart the untamed outer fringe of existence, filled with ruined intergalactic civilizations, lonely globe-roaming robots, and a memetic virus that could destroy all things.   Readers have called it- “Intriguing … atmospheric … other-worldly … excellent.” It’s currently available as an e-book through Amazon: – Amazon US – Amazon UK – Goodreads Story: Would you kill a world to save your family? In the depths of space, the cannibal planet the Host hunts. With its own resources depleted, it ‘hooks’ other living worlds through an immensely complex process called the ‘Cull’, mining them and their people to destruction. Now the Cull is coming. 9 ‘Cullsmen’ will be chosen, to …

Why Constellation Games fails at the final level – book review

MJG All Reviews, Science Fiction Leave a Comment

★★★ The premise of ‘Constellation Games’ is a playful and wholly original take on an alien invasion, as told through the eyes of a slacker My-Little-Pony game developer called Ariel Blum. When the Aliens come, with a friendly armada of every race in their ‘Constellation’, Ariel is only interested in their old video games, so he can mine through the millennia and port out a hit game of his own. It’s brilliant. Ariel is a cocky, snarky dick, but like any true ‘otaku’ he suspends his sarcasm for good content, and ‘Constellation Games’ delivers that content in spades. As I started out reading this book, through the choppy first blog posts, the unclear switches in time and timeline as suddenly …

Odaiba Cannonades

MJG Haikyo, Military Installations, Tokyo-to 3 Comments

160 years ago, Japan and America looked at each other down the barrels of cannon. Japan was in isolation, and America (the whole world, really), wanted in. Five island forts stuffed with cannon (‘daiba’) were built across Tokyo Bay to repel foreign invasion. They were never used. The foreign invasion came, and Japan opened its doors to the world. Now three of those islands are gone, incorporated into recent land developments. Two remain, one preserved, the other conserved as a habitat for birds. But why were they built at all? Why was Japan so afraid of letting foreigners in to trade? Cannon Island #3, accessible by the route at right. Across the mouth of Tokyo Bay runs Rainbow Bridge, an …